William Shakespeare’s The Jedi Doth Return

The_Jedi_Doth_Return

  • William Shakespeare’s The Jedi Doth Return
  • by Ian Doescher
  • published by Quirk Books (2014)
  • Roar Score: 4/5

So it comes to this: the last of Ian Doescher’s Shakespeare Star Wars trilogy. If you’ve read the first two books, then you know what to expect here. More of the same, plus a few surprises.

Check out our review of the first two books in this trilogy: William Shakespeare’s Star Wars and William Shakespeare’s The Empire Striketh Back.

—O, that laugh, it works me woe.
‘Tis too familiar in my memory,
And like a chime from Hell’s forsaken bells
Doth ring most evilly within mine ears.

Much more flowery and eloquent than “I know that laugh,” right?

You know the story here, so there’s no point in recapping the plot. So let’s dive in and look at the presentation.

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Jamie is a publishing/book nerd who makes a living by wrangling words together into some sense of coherence. He's the founder and owner of The Roarbots and also a contributor to Syfy Wire, StarWars.com, and GeekDad. On top of that, he hosts The Great Big Beautiful Podcast, which celebrates creativity in popular culture, science, and technology by talking to a wide variety of people who contribute to it.

William Shakespeare’s The Empire Striketh Back

  • William Shakespeare’s The Empire Striketh Back
  • by Ian Doescher
  • published by Quirk Books (2014)
  • Roar Score: 4/5

Following on the success of the first adaptation—William Shakespeare’s Star Wars—we are treated to the inevitable adaption of The Empire Strikes Back. The second film in the trilogy is beloved by most and usually regarded as the best Star Wars movie ever made (and one of the finest examples of adventure science fiction on film in general).

So how does The Empire Striketh Back compare? Quite well, thank you very much.

Ian Doescher continues to do what he did so well the first time around. The entire story is retold in iambic pentameter (with one notable exception) and has a genuine Shakespearean feel to it. Again, this feels like something Shakespeare could have actually written…if his imagination had conjured up wampa snow creatures and diminutive green warriors.

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Jamie is a publishing/book nerd who makes a living by wrangling words together into some sense of coherence. He's the founder and owner of The Roarbots and also a contributor to Syfy Wire, StarWars.com, and GeekDad. On top of that, he hosts The Great Big Beautiful Podcast, which celebrates creativity in popular culture, science, and technology by talking to a wide variety of people who contribute to it.

William Shakespeare’s Star Wars

Shakespeare's Star Wars

  • William Shakespeare’s Star Wars: Verily, A New Hope
  • by Ian Doescher
  • published by Quirk Books (2013)
  • Roar Score: 5/5

My patience runneth quickly out much like
The sands across the dunes of Tatooine.
So tell me, else thou diest quick; where shall
We find transmissions thou didst intercept?
What has thou done, say, with those plans?

I can’t believe it took me this long to get around to these. I first saw this book about a year ago when it first came out. I may have uttered the word genius when I read the description. And it really is. It’s fair to say that this first installment in the series lived up to my expectations.

Let’s get something out of the way, first, though. This is the Special Edition of Star Wars, complete with scenes of Jabba and Biggs. But I won’t hold that against the book. I promise. Those scenes are more a distraction than a flaw, though I do wonder why Doescher chose to include them.

Ian Doescher has done incredible work here. Some might say genius. He’s retold the entire movie, nearly line for line, not only in iambic pentameter but also with a genuine Shakespearean sensibility. If it weren’t for the fact that it’s…well…Star Wars, this feels like something Shakespeare could actually have written.

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Jamie is a publishing/book nerd who makes a living by wrangling words together into some sense of coherence. He's the founder and owner of The Roarbots and also a contributor to Syfy Wire, StarWars.com, and GeekDad. On top of that, he hosts The Great Big Beautiful Podcast, which celebrates creativity in popular culture, science, and technology by talking to a wide variety of people who contribute to it.